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Ellipsis

Review Ellipsis and word omission

(1) Remove part or all of the underlined word or phrase to avoid repetition or insert a short substitute word/phrase in its place.

  1. A: Have you been to that new art gallery yet?
    B: Yes, I went to the gallery just last weekend.
  2. A: Do you reckon that Simon and Julie will get married?
    B: No. I don't think they'll get married. They're too young anyway!
  3. A: Please don't forget to pick up some more butter from the shops!
    B: Of course I won't forget to get some. It's on my list.
  4. A: I haven't sent her a birthday card yet.
    B: Don't worry. I also haven't sent her a birthday card.
  5. A: I'm probably going to buy that camera we saw yesterday.
    B: Which camera? We looked at hundreds!
  6. A: Do you imagine they'll ever forgive me for what I did?
    B: Yes, I think they will forgive you for what you did eventually.

(2) Delete any words in the following sentences that do not need to be there.

  1. Take as much time as you need to take.
  2. I'm sorry Sir. We don't have any silk sheets left. Just cotton sheets.
  3. I don't know whose that car is. This car is mine.
  4. I'm surprised that he forgot to ring you. I'm sure that he had intended to ring you.
  5. I thought she would have got me a present but she hasn't got me one.
  6. She is excited by the new job but she is also a little apprehensive about it.

(3) For questions 1-6, read the following text and then choose from the list A-J the best phrase to fill each of the spaces. Each correct phrase may only be used once and two of the phrases are not needed.

a) with their chicks from the danger area. b) and takes them down to a safe stretch of quiet water c) until they turn into adults d) although they do learn from their mistakes e) capable of breaking a person's arm f) teaching them various hunting techniques g) try instead to outwit a predator h) not needing to sleep more than two hours at a time i) though they will rush back in should danger threaten j) in defence of its young against an intruder

Animal Families

Hissing and grunting loudly, a 'mute swan' belies its name (0).. J. . Should a suspected foe approach too closely, this great white bird can deliver a knockout blow with its powerful wings,
(1) ... .
e) capable of breaking a person's arm


Many animals protect their young, though not all so aggressively. Some birds, such as plovers, (2) ... . Either parent may feign injury, careering across the ground with one wing held out as if broken, to lure the predator, such as a fox or stoat, away from their young. Some birds fly off (3) ... : a rail will carry them, one at a time, in its bill, while a woodcock carries them between its feet.

Mother crocodiles too, carry their young. After hatching from the eggs laid on the river bank, the young crocodiles are vulnerable to predators such as marabou storks and hornbills. The mother picks her young up with remarkable tenderness in her great toothed jaws, (4) ... . Few other reptiles show such gentle care.

Fish generally leave their eggs and young to fend for themselves. The mouthbrooders are an exception. The female or male, or both, depending on the species, take the eggs into their mouths. Protected from predatory fish and from fungi and bacteria, the eggs hatch in the mouth and the baby fish swim out, (5) ... .

Even some insects show a surprising degree of parental care. Earwigs remain with their eggs until they have hatched. Among bees, wasps, ants and termites, a queen does all the laying of eggs, and then the workers (sterile females) care for the eggs and the larvae (6) ... .
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Ellipsis Grammar Focus

In printing, an elipsis is the term used to describe those three dots used to indicate that there are more words which have been omitted.
However in English grammar, the term ellipsis is used to speak about omitted words. These words may be omitted to avoid repetition. Read the rules of ellipsis in English grammar. Ellipsis slides





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