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Choose which of the paragraphs A-H fits into the numbered gaps in the following newspaper article. There is one paragraph which does not fit in any of the gaps. 1

Science Museum embarks on a journey to Middle Earth


Luke Layfield gets a sneak preview of a new exhibition based on the science behind. The Lord of the Rings film trilogy.

Parents who might question the educational value of their children watching Frodo and company battle the forces of evil in The Lord of the Rings blockbuster might think again. Thanks to an exhibition on the science behind the film at the National Science Museum, Tolkien's epic becomes educational.
The attraction, based on the Hollywood portrayal of Tolkien's celebrated trilogy, is just one of the museum's schemes to 'liven-up' science and make it relevant to a new generation of young people disillusioned with science in school, by engaging them with contemporary topics which they can more easily relate to.
1 _____________________________

Jon Tucker the head of the museum, is behind this latest attempt and is keen to use The Lord of the Rings to broaden the appeal of science. 'A lot of children and adults instinctively think that science is boring and not for them. What we hope to do with exhibitions such as this is to jolt that misconception and show people that science is relevant and interesting.'
The exhibition, to open in mid-September, will feature 654 real artefacts from the film, including models of some of the main characters. It aims to explain the technology behind the special effects through a series of animatronics, mechanical demonstrations and interactive computer displays.
2 _____________________________

Among these hands-on exhibits is one which will provide visitors with the opportunity to become Hobbit-sized in a scene from The Fellowship of the Ring. This made possible thanks to a scaling interactive that makes use of a new software programme called Massive - designed especially for the film's production.
In case that isn't enough to attract fans, organisers also plan to show the film, The Return of the King, in the museum's IMAX cinema. Mr Tucker,who once played Gollum in a high school production, is convinced that this showing and the exhibition itself will boost the interest of all people in science.
3 _____________________________

'What we try and do with every new exhibition is to encourage a new audience into the museum. With The Lord of the Rings we've got a golden opportunity to make science accessible and relevant to a whole new group of people,' he said. Of course, we want visitors to see the rest of the museum as well.'
In order to make this happen, the museum charges one fee to see the exhibition and then visitors get free entry to the rest of the site. There's a quarter of a mile of floor space and five floors, and with the Tolkien exhibition taking up a mere 3% of it, exhibition organisers believe people will find other things on display that interest them.
And it looks like they won't be disappointed. Research has shown that once people visit an exhibition, many of them stay to have a look around, and the Science Museum has got much to offer.
The Lord of the Rings exhibition is the Science Museum's third attempt to repackage science for young cinema-goers. The museum has also played host to a James Bond exhibition, as well as producing Titanic: The Artefact Exhibition. Despite their obvious appeal, however, these innovative exhibitions have come in for a fair share of criticism. The most common complaint is that the museum is making light of very serious subject matter.
5 _____________________________

Mr Tucker is quick to dispel this accusation of 'watering down' science. 'We totally refute that suggestion - we're not trying to 'dilute' science, We're just making it more accessible and more pertinent. I've seen some brilliant primary school teachers demonstrating the theory of relativity to really young kids using tennis and golf balls.'
In further defence, the museum points out that in its visitor feedback research for the Titanic exhibition, 96% gave a positive satisfaction rating and commended the museum for the absence of 'childish gimmicks', indicating that it was a suitably 'adult' experience.
6 _____________________________

The museum points out, too, that it's not only visitors who are satisfied. Peer Cogreave, the director of Save British Science, a pressure group which publicises issues of scientific policy, supports the efforts of the Science Museum, which is the only European venue for a worldwide tour of the Tolkien exhibition.
'It's very difficult for most scientists to really know what young people are interested in these days. If you can get them interested by hooking science on topics that interest them and then get them to engage them with the rest of what science has to offer then that is a wholly good thing.'
7 _____________________________

He also cites the BBC's Walking With Dinosaurs as a prime example of broadening the popular appeal of science, saying. 'That was the only programme for a long time which has knocked EastEnders and Coronation Street off the top of the ratings and it did so by successfully making science appeal to a wider audience.'


A
In order to make this happen, the museum charges one fee to see the exhibition and then visitors get free entry to the rest of the site. There's a quarter of a mile of floor space and five floors, and with the Tolkien exhibition taking up a mere 3% of it, exhibition organisers believe people will find other things on display that interest them.

B
The exhibition, to open in mid-September, will feature 654 real artefacts from the film, including models of some of the main characters. It aims to explain the technology behind the special effects through a series of animatronics, mechanical demonstrations and interactive computer displays.

C
In May the education secretary, Charles Clarke, mooted the idea of involving museums such as the Science Museum in the management and running of secondary schools. 'Let's keep science where it's supposed to be, in the classroom.'
D
In further defence, the museum points out that in its visitor feedback research for the Titanic exhibition, 96% gave a positive satisfaction rating and commended the museum for the absence of 'childish gimmicks', indicating that it was a suitably 'adult' experience.

E
The attraction, based on the Hollywood portrayal of Tolkien's celebrated trilogy, is just one of the museum's schemes to 'liven-up' science and make it relevant to a new generation of young people disillusioned with science in school, by engaging them with contemporary topics which they can more easily relate to.

F
The Lord of the Rings exhibition is the Science Museum's third attempt to repackage science for young cinema-goers. The museum has also played host to a James Bond exhibition, as well as producing Titanic: The Artefact Exhibition. Despite their obvious appeal, however, these innovative exhibitions have come in for a fair share of criticism. The most common complaint is that the museum is making light of very serious subject matter.

G
'It's very difficult for most scientists to really know what young people are interested in these days. If you can get them interested by hooking science on topics that interest them and then get them to engage them with the rest of what science has to offer then that is a wholly good thing.'

H
In case that isn't enough to attract fans, organisers also plan to show the film, The Return of the King, in the museum's IMAX cinema. Mr Tucker,who once played Gollum in a high school production, is convinced that this showing and the exhibition itself will boost the interest of all people in science.

2

Computer Wise

Complete the following article by writing the missing words in the spaces. Use only one word for each space.

Computer wise

(1)
_______
From
the day we feel our children (2)
_______
are
capable of understanding, we begin educating them (3)
_______
about
the perils ever-present in our modern world. We teach (4)
_______
them
that they must never cross the road (5)
_______
without
looking both ways, accept lifts from strangers, or take sweets from people they don't know; the list (6)
_______
goes
on and on.

(7)
_______
In
light of these warning, isn't it ironic that we (8)
_______
still
ignore one of the biggest threats of all .... the Internet? In this age of the PC - (9)
_______
almost/nearly
every house has one - we as parents often fail in (10)
_______
our
duty to protect our children from tis potential source of danger.

Just (11)
_______
as
we supervise what our little ones - and (12)
_______
not
so little ones - watch on television, we should (13)
_______
also
be aware of what they're doing while they're surfing the Net. Of course, we can't be forever looking over their shoulders when they're online, but there are ways (14)
_______
of
increasing Internet safety. using software to filter and block what young users (15)
_______
can
access, warning children against giving out any personal information, and talking openly about cyber hazards, are a (16)
_______
few
of the really important first steps.

3

Tomorrow's World.

Image
Read the article and put these sentences in the correct place. (1) has been matched to "e" for you.
  1. Human nature is the greatest single confounder of all the predictions of decades gone by
  2. Each age has its future fears that turn out to be groundless
  3. Immortality has been a constant theme in futurology
  4. Fifty years ago, the futurologists of the day were confidently forecasting an outlook that was silver, shiny and teeming with intelligent robots.
  5. Forecasting what life is going to be like years down the line is a dodgy business.
  6. Neither are there any aliens on the horizon, nor even in the galaxy next door.

What didn't come to pass


(1) Forecasting what life is going to be like years down the line is a dodgy business. Even the experts don't always get it right. Take Bill Gates, for example. In 1981, he firmly stated that '640K of memory ought to be enough for anyone.' So it's more than a bit embarrassing for him now that, even a standard issue home PC, you need 200 times that amount of memory just to run his own company's software. Fortunately for Bill, other predicted that the technological future would involve giant computers that were the size of cities, whereas what we actually have are ever-shrinking models that you can tuck neatly into your pocket, which are hundreds of times more powerful than their lumbering predecessors Nano-technology is definitely the way forward.

(2)
___________
They imagined the robots of the future would not only be able to think for themselves, but get on with the housework too. But what have we got? More time-saving devices and what seems like less time. Just how did that happen? And absolutely no sign of a helpful house robot to mix a perfect Martini at the end of a hard day at the cyberface. Face it, we haven't even cracked robotic vacuum cleaners yet.

(3)
___________
Air tours are not booking moon packages, and space travel is only for the trained or for fantastically wealthy few. True, all-in-one body suits (the uniform of brave space pioneers) did make a number of fashion appearances - think lycra exercise gear in the eighties - but on the whole, we've realised that body suits are a misnomer, because they don't actually suit bodies, other than those with faultless dimensions.
Which brings me to another big fib: perfect bodies in the future. No matter how much nipping, tucking, sucking and filling we do, our bodies continue to traitorously reveal the sings of our increasing years. Sorry!

(4)
___________
Actually, we do now know how to extend life - by eating less and exercising more. Even so, Californian cryogenics super-salesmen have persuaded some people to part with vast sums of money on a promise that will defrost them when 'the time is right'. But since we haven't yet perfected freezing strawberries, these poor deluded souls may be nothing more than mucky puddles by 2052.
As for transport, the reason we aren't all buzzing around in our own mini-planes has quite a lot to do with the fact that nobody thought about what would happen when everyone wanted one. Were they going to be stacked high above our streets, stuck in an endless holding pattern while we desperately tried to do our shopping?

(5)
___________
Nutritionally-perfect pills to replace all our food? Nothing, but online shopping, so there's no need to leave your home/computer and traipse round the shops? Both have met with a resounding thumbs down from the public. We simply refuse to give up eating our nutritionally nightmarish fish and chips. And we show absolutely no inclination to forego and the pleasure of touching, examining and trying the purchases we make. We love our food and our shopping, thank you very much.

(6)
___________
In the fifties, concerns focused on monsters and flying saucers. Ours are reproductive. For instance we worry that come 2052, it will be increasingly normal for grannies to be giving birth, or that male pregnancy will be possible. It's my bet that if you asked 100 women in their sixties, now or in 2052, if they wanted a test-tube baby or double-glazing, 99 per cent would opt for the windows. As for male pregnancy, I have it filed unter 'o' as in 'Only for the lunatic', along with human cloning and genetic engineering. Yes, it might all be technically possible, and you might well see genetic engineering for very specific and well-defined medical reasons, but it will remain phenomenally risky for the baby. It's an unchangeable part of human nature that what we really want, above everything else, is the best for our future generations.


4

Look at the descriptions of inventions predicted for the next few decades.



Work and play in the 21st century




Behind the wheel


Cars of the future will take much of the strain out of driving. The intelligent navigation system in this 2010 model can choose the best route for you by monitoring an online traffic database for hold-ups, while the cruise control keeps a constant distance from the car in front. And if you exceed the speed limit, the speedometer speaks a polite warning to you. Security worries will also be a thing of the past - your car will only allow bona fide drivers behind the wheel, recognising them by the irises of their eyes!

The Intelligent House


This 'smart' fridge will be connected to the Internet as part of a home network that runs your domestic life, interacting with the barcodes on your food, and re-ordering them online as you use them. Virtually all domestic appliances will be linked by computers, so that the fridge can communicate with the cooker and rubbish bin, co-ordinating complex tasks such as cooking a meal. Your electric toothbrush will even be able to let your toaster know that you're ready for breakfast!

Global Games


Children of the future will never be able to complain that there's no one to play with. Equipped with a virtual reality headset, this twelve-year-old is taking part in global games, here a medieval jousting tournament. His opponent, selected for him by the computer, lives on the other side of the world.

Holographic Conferencing


Holographic conferencing and virtual reality meetings will allow people to interact with colleagues and clients via computer, without needing to leave the comfort of their own homes. You can hold a virtual meeting with several people sitting around a table.




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