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Chapter - 1

Sentence Mixer

Play the game. Give your partner a correct sentence with all the words in a jumbled order. Can you re-construct a good sentence? Click on one of the exercise examples and send your partner a text message with the scrambled version of the sentence. Can your partner re-create the original sentence? Sometimes it is possible to create another correct sentence by changing the word order.

Articles

When to use the indefinite article a and when to use the definite article the depends mostly on how specific you want to be. During a wedding ceremony the groom would say, "Give me the ring! The wedding ring!" because he must have a particular ring, while a carpenter would say, ‘Hand me a nail" because he doesn’t care which nail in the box he uses. Usually the bigger problem is not whether to use a definite or indefinite article, but whether to use an article at all.

Sentence Structure

Read these sentences. What do they mean? Say whether they are correct or incorrect or whether they not have the intended meaning. If they are correct, write capital 'C' into the gap, otherwise, write I

Article practice - (A)

Complete the gaps with 'a', 'an', 'the' or 'X' (no article)

Article practice - (B)

Complete the gaps with 'a', 'an', 'the' or 'X' (no article)

Article practice - (C)

Complete the gaps with 'a', 'an', 'the' or 'X' (no article)

Article practice - (D)

Complete the gaps with 'a', 'an', 'the' or 'X' (no article)

Article practice - (E)

Complete the gaps with 'a', 'an', 'the' or 'X' (no article)

Article practice - (F)

Complete the gaps with 'a', 'an', 'the' or 'X' (no article)

Article practice - (G)

Complete the gaps with 'a', 'an', 'the' or 'X' (no article)

Article practice - (H)

Complete the gaps with 'a', 'an', 'the' or 'X' (no article)

Article practice - (I)

Complete the gaps with 'a', 'an', 'the' or 'X' (no article)

Article practice - (J)

Complete the gaps with 'a', 'an', 'the' or 'X' (no article)

Article practice - (K)

Complete the gaps with 'a', 'an', 'the' or 'X' (no article)

Article practice - (L)

Complete the gaps with 'a', 'an', 'the' or 'X' (no article)

The past simple or the present perfect?

Using each column once for each sentence, choose words from each column to make sentences about past regrets. Write the sentences in the space on the write. You can use your imagination to finish each sentence with whatever subject you like. Make sure that the sentence stays in the past tense.

Chapter - 2

Adjective suffixes

Some verbs can be changed into adjective form by changing the ending of the word.

Adjectives after words

Adjectives usually come before the words they describe but with some words we use adjectives after the words: be get become seem

Adjective Types

When we use more than one adjective, we usually use a word order depending on the adjective type. Opinion, size, age, shape, colour, origin, material and purpose.
Leon drives a beautiful red French car

Adjective Types

Some words can modify the adjective

Adjective Practice

A set of multiple-choice questions about adjectives

Adjective Opposites

Sometimes we can form an opposite of an adjective by adding a prefix. For example:

Adjective word order

In English, it is common to use more than one adjective before a noun for example, "He's a silly young fool," or "She's a smart, energetic woman." When you use more than one adjective, you have to put them in the right order, according to type. This page will explain the different types of adjectives and the correct order for them.

Adjectives - Grammar

If a word modifies a noun or pronoun, it is an adjective, even if that word is usually associated with a different part of speech. Adjectives usually come before nouns. Eg: Rape seed oil is an oil made from Rape seed, but Oilseed rape is the vegetable which this oil is made from.
A bus conductor is not a bus but a man who is a conductor.

Chapter - 3

Chapter - 5

Conditionals in English grammar

There are a number of structures in English that are called the conditionals which are used to talk about possible or imaginary situations. A "Condition" is a "situation or circumstance". For example: If a certain condition is true, then a particular result happens. Conditions are situations that must happen to change another situation. The structure of the conditionals is straightforward. There are two basic possibilities in terms of order in the sentence: A conditional sentence has two parts: The if clause, which tells us about the condition. The result clause, which tells us about the situation being effected These clauses can be in either order.

The Zero Conditional

Zero Conditional: Certainty
The Zero conditional is used for things that are always true as long as the condition is met.

First Conditional

A real possibility in the future. A First Conditional sentence connects two future actions, where one must take place before the second is possible.
If this happens, then that will happen to (probably / most likely)

Second Conditional

The Second Conditional can be used to talk about
imaginary present situations, where we are imagining something different from what is really the case. We can also use it to talk about things in the future that are unlikely to happen, as the condition is unlikely to be met. We use the past tense in the condition part and would for the result.

Third Conditional

Third Conditional: Imaginary past The third conditional is used when we are talking about the past and imagining something different from what actually happened:

Mixed Conditionals

Mixed conditionals are not assorted practice examples of first, second and third conditionals, but are conditionals with verb tenses mixed so that the complete sentence does not match first, second or third conditional form.
  1. english without a capital letter: ba0a6ddd94c73698a3658f92ac222f8a
  2. have a sandwich 4a04890400b5d7bac101baace5d7e994
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